January 2021 newsletter

Happy New Year and welcome to 2021!

As the Covid news keeps getting darker, and the Vaccine news seems a dim glimmer at the moment we must all brace ourselves for further restrictions, with no sunshine or gardening to distract us. Let us be thankful for glowing fires, warm socks and the gift of joy in creating textiles to keep us happy.

Our Living Threads committee wish you all a better 2021 to come. We will get through this, and Brexit shortages and delays, during the coming months. Shortages – be it food or fabrics, makes us more creative, finding ways round the problems, using stuff we forgot we had, cooking up new dishes, etc. In fact, the only thing I don’t want to get creative with is the loo paper!

I had a disaster on Christmas Eve – Virgin Media ‘lost’ my email address! It has completely gone from their records, although the internet and phone sections of my account remain. I wasted three hours of a very precious day on the phone with technicians trying to sort it all out, to no avail. Hence I have had to change my email address to gillitheokritoff@gmail.com so please, if you have sent me anything recently to go in the newsletter, resend to the gmail address! However, I still managed to get all the presents wrapped and mince pies made, so Christmas wasn’t ruined!


Meanwhile Annette Budzisz shares with us her experiences over the last year:

Throughout the pandemic I have tried to stay positive, and like many other folk have experienced the highs, and sadly some devastating lows too, but thankfully during the spring and summer months there was always plenty to occupy my time in the garden.

While busy digging and planting I began to daydream about my early childhood and remember stories of ‘The Faraway Tree’, ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ and ‘Thumbelina’.

I had a few old garden ornaments, and began to play with them, grouping them together to make a story, creating mysterious pathways   for my characters to follow and thoroughly getting absorbed in the land of make-believe!

Fortunately for me, none of my neighbours were peering over the garden fence at the time, but even if they had, I was so involved in play (just like a young child again) that even had they called to me I doubt I would have heard them.

In a bizarre way being in Lockdown, unlocked my childish imagination which had been hidden away for decades, and just like an old friend it was so good to be in touch again. All the constraints of daily life faded while I was in the garden.

Easter was approaching and I found myself not only decorating the living room with displays of spring flowers, chicks and crocheted Easter eggs, but I made Easter wreaths and took the idea of hanging eggs into the garden much to my neighbours’ surprise!

As families began to make rainbows, and messages appeared in windows acknowledging our wonderful health workers in the NHS, I joined in by crocheting bunting and a rainbow to hang up on my garden gate.

Summer came and brought so many beautiful flowers, particularly sunflowers that seemed to pop up in many front gardens and bring so much pleasure to the walkers who were exploring new streets and avenues.

Soon it was time to take the crocheted red, white and blue bunting down and replace it with a crocheted harvest of fruit and flowers on the garden gate.

We had enjoyed a long warm summer with many showers to extend the growing season, but now autumn was coming and with it came Halloween and Bonfire night. A time to crochet pumpkins and swirling red, orange and yellow leaves, spiders, spooks and witches on brooms…

The wind howled and the rain clattered, but the crocheted autumn display clung onto the bars of the wrought iron garden gate and miraculously survived everything October and November threw at it.

Meanwhile the display changed yet again, and neighbours and strangers woke up to poppy wreaths and Snow White doves to remind us of our brave veterans in the two world wars and beyond.

That same day I went to my postbox and found a lovely note of thanks for my simple display, and I was moved to tears by the kindness of the words I read.

What had begun as a childish fantasy in the privacy of my home and back garden had gradually extended to my garden gate and was now on show for anyone passing by to enjoy.

All those balls of yarn, scraps of card and various odds ends I had squirrelled away for many years had found a new purpose, and will continue to reflect the changing seasons and events that mark this very strange time in all our lives.

Maybe one day, there will be just one, very happy crocheted face, smiling at all the neighbours and strangers as they pass the gate, holding a long-awaited message ‘Safe at last!’

Stay safe and well.

Best wishes,

Annette Budzisz


We asked our members to send me a note about their favourite tool for their work, for a new monthly feature.

Greta Fitchett replied:

My favourite tool at the moment is the flower stitcher attachment for the sewing machine.

It will do eyelets, but there are lots of other creative uses as well!

The tool pivots the fabric so that circles are stitched, and adjustments allow for large and small circles.

Thanks Greta! I’ve used the flower stitcher before as well. It’s fabulous and can do most decorative stitches in quite large circles.

Viv Denscombe responded to the Favourite tools request:

“Choosing a favourite arty item was a really tricky choice between a couple of things, so hope I can cheat a bit and have two! 

My favourites are Gesso and Gelli plate – really couldn’t be without either.

Gesso – I use it for sizing thinner paper and fabrics ready for journalling; as white paint, as it gives a lovely matt finish; as a glaze, to tone down too bright colours; basically, a real ‘go-to’.

Gelli plate – quick and very easy tool to create a whole stash of layered, coloured papers and fabrics with unique finishes; My go-to tool for those creative block times – once the paint comes out and the stash starts building, ideas come flooding in.

If I think about this, I’m sure there’s loads of ‘favourites’ – but these two are ‘deffos’”.


My husband surprised me this Christmas with a quilting present – a pack of 64 ‘Spoolhuggers’. These curly bits of silicone wrap around your thread spool to hold onto those tails of thread that otherwise tangle into a mess. I had bought a Black Friday bargain of spools of Wonderfil Eleganza Perle threads and was worrying about how I was going to keep them in order and these are just the answer! For once I got the perfect surprise gift (past disasters have included a frying pan and a garden spade…)

Please do keep your bits of news and favourite tools coming in, it is really useful to us all. Maybe you got a good book for Christmas? Let us know – gillitheokritoff@gmail.com


I’m preparing to do a new online Quilt-Along, run by Nicholas Ball, via Instagram. I’m not a huge fan of negotiating Instagram but it starts on 5th January from his @quiltsfromtheattic Instagram page. He’s also doing a 3hr online workshop on the project via www.craftymonkies.com on 16th January.

Nick is an Improv quilter – no measuring or rulers, just-go-for-it attitude. Very liberating, EASY and great fun. The project is his quilt Shoals – beautiful sleek silver fish in dark blue water. It’s from his book, see photos below. Improv curves – not tried them before…!

If you have any newsletter contributions, puzzles, recommendations, etc, do please send them to me via the Living Threads email address: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  or email me directly at gillitheokritoff@gmail.com We do all love to see what others have been up to, or hear news related to our love of textiles. Otherwise it will be all about my sewing life again!

Meanwhile, don’t forget to check our website at: www.livingthreadstextileartists.com  or email us at: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  or check us out on Facebook. The website has been brightened up, with new additions so do go and have a look. Our Virtual Exhibition of 6” squares on the theme of ‘Gardens’ is up there now.

We wish you all a speedy recovery if you or family have been unwell or had Covid-19, and that the rest of us manage to avoid it.

Everyone please stay safe and keep creating. We will get through this and come out the other side. The vaccine will eventually mean we can all meet up and share our stories and textile work.

Until February

Cheers

Gilli Theokritoff, Newsletter Editor

December 2020 Newsletter

See that white speck? It’s the light at the end of the tunnel. At least, that’s how it feels after the encouraging news recently about vaccines. We’ve just got to get through this ‘Winter of our Discontent’. Arm yourself with hot water bottles, chunky knitwear and box sets and sewing projects…

I’m afraid this newsletter is mostly about what I’ve been doing or thinking about – it’s so hard to find new stories during Lockdown!

I’ve been keeping myself busy with attending lots of online classes, etc. As I said last month, I did a Felted Robins Zoom class, although unfortunately my internet was down so I had a wait for them to send me a recording. Here’s my first effort. Head shape all wrong, but I’m improving! Apologies to anyone who tried to follow my link last month. Spellcheck deleted the second ‘s’ from the address. It should read www.themakerss.co.uk. They sell lots of fabulous kits and have plenty of You Tube tutorials. Needlefelting is very relaxing, although painful if you get distracted and stab yourself with the barbed needle!

Christmas is looming and I’ve been present making. Here’s a friend, Fay Harrison, modelling one of my Winter masks. I’m also running up a bed quilt for Christmas. I might as well post it here, as we won’t be having visitors this festive season! It is now almost sewn together and I hope to get it on the longarm quilter in time for the run up to the 25th

Advent starts now, and this year I have an Advent Calendar from Bonne Maman – tiny jars of jam behind each window! Lots of toast at breakfast I expect!

First weekend of December I’m going on a Virtual Quilt Retreat – a full weekend in my sewing room, surrounded by snacks and coffee (and maybe wine or gin, or even a festive cocktail). It’s with The Thread House; we shall be making two Christmas inspired cushions and some wall hanging cuties, plus quizzes, raffles, prizes and lots of chatter over the dedicated Facebook link.

I’ve also gotten very excited over the 2021 Stitchtopia holiday brochure. I’ve booked for a week in June, split between Milan and the Italian Lakes, with quilting tours and workshops. I’m tempted to do one in Carcassone in the autumn and intrigued by one to Izbekistan… All Arena Travel/Stitchtopia holidays are accompanied by a textiles expert and there are special interest holidays for knitters, crochet, cross stitchers and quilters. All COVID safe and with a good cancellation or postponement policy. Have a look, get tempted… https://www.arenatravel.com/craft-holidays/

I’d love to be travelling down to London for the V&A’s new exhibition, starting 12th December, on ‘Handbags’. It looks to be a real treat. I don’t know how long it runs for, but we aren’t going anywhere this side of 2020, so my experience may have to be virtual. The V&A does stage such wonderful exhibitions though. www.vam.ac.uk

If you are hankering for a creative mixed media project, look no further than Laura Kemshall’s Sketchbook Challenge, on www.designmatterstv.com

Here’s Laura’s project intro:

On my Instagram page I suggested the idea of working along with me to fill a sketchbook in four weeks. All the feedback said that would be a great idea and you’d love to! Fantastic news! Of course this is open to everyone, not just the UK, so I hope you’ll join me wherever you are in the world.

So, here’s what’s on offer:

  • Take 1 sketchbook and join me for 8 video workshops over 4 weeks. You can work along with me or start whenever you like and work at your own pace.
  • It’s £12 for all 8 classes and once you’re signed up, you’ll keep access to them forever.
  • We’ll cover choosing a sketchbook, losing the blank white page, collage, playing with paint, composition ideas, drawing (don’t be nervous, I’ll be helping you!), print, working with text and lots more.

So excited for you to join me on this action packed mini course. I know we’re going to end up with some fantastic sketchbooks and have a lot of fun on the way.

If you head over to the website you can see some of the fantastic and varied work people have been doing. Laura is a fantastic and enthusiastic teacher, it’s well worth it if that’s where your interest lies.

Janet Humphries has been busy:-

Can you remember when you were little making a  “den” from a sheet and your Mum’s clothes horse, a place to have a tea party with dolls and teddies? After receiving some plain white sheets from a neighbour, I dyed them and started cutting and stitching to make a small Wendy House for a friend’s granddaughters.

I had help from the cat obviously. As you can see, she likes to be involved.

It was a fun way to spend a few afternoons, using up fabrics, my stash never seems to go down though. Hopefully the girls will enjoy playing with their playhouse next Summer.

Jan x

HOT OFF THE PRESS – Our Members 6” Garden project has culminated in a Virtual Exhibition and Video which is now ready to view on the website.
Grab a cuppa and have a look!
Virtual Exhibition – The Living Threads Group
THANK YOU to all entrants for their fabulous contributions.

If you have any newsletter contributions, puzzles, recommendations, etc, do please send them to me via the Living Threads email address: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  or email me directly at g.theokritoff@ntlworld.com We do all love to see what others have been up to, or hear news related to our love of textiles. Otherwise it will be all about my sewing life again!

Meanwhile, don’t forget to check our website at: www.livingthreadstextileartists.com  or email us at: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  or check us out on Facebook. The website has been brightened up with new additions, so do go and have a look.

We wish you all a speedy recovery if you or family have been unwell or had Covid-19, and that the rest of us manage to avoid it.

Everyone please stay safe and keep creating. We will get through this and come out the other side.

Until January 2021!

Cheers

Gilli Theokritoff, Newsletter Editor

November 2020 newsletter

Well, the leaves are almost all fallen, the temperature has dropped, the clocks gone back and the nights drawing in. Before long it will be dark soon after 3pm and fires will grackle in grates throughout the land…

Nottinghamshire has just moved into Tier 3, but soon maybe the entire country may face a further Lockdown. Prospects look bleak, but luckily we have an interest in fabric, texture and colour that should lift our spirits somewhat. Now that the garden has gone to sleep you have no excuse not to return to your sewing station and enjoy some stitching, lacemaking, knitting or whatever other creative outlet you feel inspired to do.

I’ve struggled to get busy with my art quilts but have been finishing off a lot of projects, doing quite a few Blocks-of-the-Month that I have to subscribed to and making masks. Guess what will be in most of my family Christmas parcels this year! We have a couple of new babies in the family  via my nieces, so I’ve been busy with making playmats for them. I also got inspired by those fabulous autumn leaves outside my window and have started a wallhanging.

Gilli wallhanging

The Quilters’ Guild has been running talks and workshops via Zoom, which I have been enrolling on. Today there is a talk by Kaffe Fassett on colour and last week was a delightful talk by Christina Cameli on creating texture through simple free machine quilting. There is a talk every month, from different speakers, usually from the US, who are much more switched on to using Zoom in this way.

I’ve also booked on a 90 minute workshop on Quilt-as-You-Go techniques and one with Jo Avery to do freehand dandelion clocks!

If you are a member of the Quilters’ Guild you just go to the website and book that way, or, for non-members, you can access these at www.beyondthefestivalofquilts.seetickets.com

There are plenty of other sites offering online workshops in embroidery, quilting and other textile crafts. www.craftymonkies.com comes highly recommended and of course you can’t get better than the Royal School of Needlework: https://royal-needlework.org.uk/courses/day-classes/ . I’m sure there are plenty of others and if you have attended any and enjoyed them please let me know for future listing, or, better still, write a review for the newsletter!

Joan Pilkington has written a lovely piece on her lacemaking adventures:

Over 40 years ago I was given a felt doll and fabric to dress her as a lace maker.

To my shame she has languished in a drawer for all those years with my saying ‘One day’ every time I opened that drawer.

This year Covid-19 has meant that my husband and I needed to self-isolate! This would be the opportunity to tidy and remove things from our cluttered home! On opening ‘that drawer’ I decided that rather than Spring Cleaning the ‘one day’ had come to transform the doll into a lace maker; a long overdue project and a much more enjoyable activity!

‘One day’ stretched to four weeks! I knew where to find the folder with patterns for dolls clothes, saved from Home and Country magazine dating back many years, also the tiny bobbins and the book by Ann Collier (Dolls and dolls houses) providing lace patterns for different sizes of doll. I had to adapt the patterns as my doll was ‘an in between size.

To give the doll’s body shape, I made a corset, followed by pantaloons and petticoat, made with old fine linen fabric bottom edged with lace using threads: 100 Brok and 36 Tanne (gimp) Next the dress was made. Snap fasteners were invented in 1885 and so if the doll was late Victorian, these could be used to fasten the back of the dress, rather than buttons. Lace cuffs and a front piece extending to a back collar were made using adapted patterns from Ann Collier’s book and threads: 100 Brok and 12 perlé (gimp). Narrow ribbon formed a belt. Small pieces of fine glove leather were used to make little shoes tied with very narrow ribbon. A lace cap for her head using threads 80 Brok and 12 perlé; and a small bead and metal cup added colour as a broach at the neckline. The shawl picks up the red in the dress and is made using a shiny, unknown thread similar in thickness to 50Tanne. The design has holes surrounded by gimp close to the edge suitable for threading ribbon and this ribbon has been used to secure the shawl to the doll.

The chair and pillow stand have wooden bobbins as legs and chair back. The pillow is stuffed with paper straw. With only 8 bobbins I have used Kat stitch for the lace on the pillow. The bobbins have been spangled with tiny beads and a thread has been threaded through the spangles and anchored to the pillow to keep the bobbins in order. In Sweden a folkdance forms this stitch by the movements of the dancers. They carry threads that are wound around giant pegs in the ground. The pin cushion is stuffed with emery filings. The pins are fine, small-headed, longer than I would have liked. The heads are too large on the shorter pins used for Bruges lace. I found a piece of slate in my garden to use as a base for the doll.

As the weather has been so good during the ‘lockdown’ due to Covid 19 and I have been making lace in the garden. This gave me the idea to photograph my doll amongst the flowers to give the exhibit its title.

 

Judith Burnett has brought the garden inside for a bit of inspiration – “playing with seedheads, as brushes, to make marks with Indian ink -and some added colour”.

If you have any newsletter contributions, puzzles, recommendations, etc, do please send them to me via the Living Threads email address: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  or email me directly at g.theokritoff@ntlworld.com We do all love to see what others have been up to, or hear news related to our love of textiles.

Meanwhile, don’t forget to check our website at: www.livingthreadstextileartists.com  or email us at: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  or check us out on Facebook.

The website has been brightened up, with new additions – so do go and have a look.

Soon we will be adding the new contributions you will hopefully all make to the Gardens 6” Challenge!

We wish you all a speedy recovery if you or family have been unwell or had Covid-19, and that the rest of us manage to avoid it.

Everyone please stay safe and keep creating. We will get through this and come out the other side.

Until December!

Cheers

Gilli Theokritoff, Newsletter Editor

October 2020 newsletter

Autumn has finally settled in and the summer days are over. Welcome to warm socks, scarves and slippers, hot drinks and cosy nights. Also to longer evenings inside as the light disappears early, leaving us with more sewing time maybe?

We are still caught in the stranglehold of COVID19, with some areas in total lockdown and all of us somewhat confused about what we can and cannot do, so we are hunkering down and leaving the streets, cafes and bars to the younger generations. While we have this time on our hands we might expect to be able to spend our enforced leisure following our creative impulses, but for many of us these have dried up.

Talking of finding creativity hard work in these strange times, Julie Williams shares her current project:

Over the past few (weird) months, I‘ve found that I have plenty of ideas and initial enthusiasm for producing work.

But, every time, after starting, I quickly lose interest, abandon what I’ve started and move on to something else.

However I’ve just done this Lino cut, these are ‘tryouts‘ on paper and fabric.

Now I need to find better background fabric and then decide how I’m going to add stitch.

Work in Progress……I hope!

Julie W

Annie Nicoll has been busy too:

After the long haul of completing my sofa makeover, I decided to go back to mosaics. I had received a commission for a mosaic to go into my friend Joy’s new kitchen. She was having all the doors made to match her Art Deco living room doors, so that was my starting point for the design. I decided to do a triptych as it would be easier to transport. So after nine weeks of cutting, cementing and grouting, it is finally finished. The only problem now is how to get it to Joy’s house in Spain. The original plan of a trip to collect it keeps getting put off due to the combined difficulties of Covid 19 and Brexit. So probably I will get to keep it for a lot longer than I imagined.

Annie N

Viv Denscombe has a great report here:

A Yarn and a Half

I’m a member and committee member of Cosby Quilters….even though I have never actually completed a real quilt in my life – the nearest I have come to it are wall hangings, but I’m still allowed in!

Last year one of the local Cosby ladies came up with the idea of Yarn Bombing the village and asked as many Cosby groups and individuals as possible to take part. The exhibition ran concurrent with the annual Cosby Victory Show, so we had many passing visitors. It turned out to be a great success and so it was decided to repeat the idea this year.

The theme this year was ‘Childrens’ Story Books’.  It turned out to be an even greater success and demonstrated a really wide and diverse collection of knitted, crocheted, felted and, basically, anything and everything that could be created with yarn.

Many of the stories were well known favourites including Peter Rabbit, Three Billy Goats Gruff, Harry Potter, Rapunzel, Noah’s Ark, and Jack and the Beanstalk (created by our very own Sue Wilson).  Cosby Quilters entered Jungle Book.  There were also more modern stories – which I must admit (not having any Grandchildren) I hadn’t heard of, including The Scarecrows Wedding.  The Wedding, in addition to the full-sized knitted scarecrows, complete in their full wedding attire, included various animals including a cow – complete with cow pat and flies!

In addition to the main stories being told in yarn, many of the lamp posts, telegraph poles and basically, anything that didn’t move, was dressed in yarn flowers, wraps, animals and 3D items inspired by nature.

It was a really incredible display of talent, enthusiasm and dedication.

Next year’s event is themed ‘Up, Up and Away’ to coincide with Cosby’s final Victory Show….I’ve already heard murmurings of ideas and they sound incredible….hopefully see you there….

If you have any newsletter contributions, puzzles, recommendations, etc, do please send them to me via the Living Threads email address: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com  We do all love to see what others have been up to, or hear news related to our love of textiles.

I’ve not got much to add. I was gearing up for starting classes again, only to have to pull the plug on them. Theoretically they can go ahead, as they come under the educational exemption, but it feels all wrong in the current climate to be bringing possibly vulnerable people together, even all suitably distanced, etc. I’m learning my way around Zoom workshop teaching and filming tutorials, but it wont be the same. I miss the connection with my fellow stitchers and the communal fun we have!

Sadly also, we have made the unwelcome decision to postpone our April 2021 Exhibition at Trent College until Easter the following year. Things are too uncertain at the moment and the planning and preparation cannot be done without teams meeting up and working together – not something we can count on being able to do for the foreseeable future.  We are planning a Virtual Exhibition of small pieces of work going up on the website and Facebook in December and will have photos of the 2019 exhibition on there as well soon.

Meanwhile, don’t forget to check our website at: www.livingthreadstextileartists.com or email us at: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com or check us out on Facebook.

It has come to our attention that not everyone has been refunded for bookings made for classes which we rolled over from March 2020 and since we can’t see when classes can re-start we want to clear the slate! Please contact your tutor directly and provide details and banking info if you are in this situation.

We wish you all a speedy recovery if you or family have been unwell or had Covid-19, and that the rest of us manage to avoid it.

Everyone please stay safe and keep creating. We will get through this and come out the other side.

Until November!

Cheers

Gilli Theokritoff, Newsletter Editor

September 2020 newsletter

The end of summer is upon us and the weather has turned cooler – there’s still the chance of an Indian summer to come, but meanwhile I’m looking forward to the plums and apples we are harvesting. In fact, the cheeky resident squirrel has taken all my Victoria plums but luckily the neighbours have plenty to share. One of the fortunate sides of Lockdown has been how much community support there has been and the forging of strong relationships with neighbours.

Lockdown is still going on for some areas of the countryside and we are all taking a cautious approach to venturing out into the wider community. Mask wearing is prevalent, and it has been interesting to spot the home-made ones! So many fabrics, so many styles.

Last month Living Threads member Jennie Riley set us an anagram challenge:
1 QUIN GUILT.                               2 MY ROBE RIDE
3 THE SLUT.                                  4 BELT HIM.
5 HANGS VILE DIRT.                    6 COIN CHUG.
7 PORK SHOW.                             8 BOH NIX TIE  IS
9 DOTED CANTS TORN.            10 TEENS PLATE DRYER

I hope you all had a go. I couldn’t get them all, but now here are the answers!

  1. QUILTING
  2. EMBROIDERY
  3. SHUTTLE
  4. THIMBLE
  5. LIVING THREADS
  6. COUCHING
  7. WORKSHOP
  8. EXHIBITIONS
  9. STRANDED COTTONS
  10. TAPESTRY NEEDLES

Janet Humphreys has contributed this interesting piece:

Jenny Ashmore and I spent a lovely morning eco dyeing using plants picked from the garden. Working outside in glorious weather, we spread out the leaves and flowers on pre scoured and mordanted fabrics then rolled them tightly around sticks and metal cans. These were steamed whilst we had our lunchbreak then unwrapped.

It was so exciting unreeling the fabric….is it going to be a slushy mess or a success? We were quite chuffed with the results. Rose, geranium and acer leaves all worked well.

Jenny is planning to use her best pieces in a stitched panel and I am making “arty” aprons with mine.

A recommendation for you from Sally Marsh, if you are travelling down south the Sunbury Embroidery Gallery. It’s a beautiful gallery and café, with its main emphasis on embroidery, but featuring guest exhibitions from a range of associated artistic crafts, such as illustration, jewellery, etc. It is in Sunbury-on-Thames, not far from Hampton Court. Well worth a visit of you are in the area, and so good to know that there are art galleries featuring textiles at last. www.sunburygallery.org

We are still considering what to do about our workshops and classes in the New Year. Some groups are starting to get together and others are waiting until next summer! Venues remain a problem until they work out how to work with multiple different users. I don’t think many venues or groups can cope with meetings of larger numbers, properly socially distanced.

I’ve attended a Zoom patchwork workshop, which was great. I didn’t have to cart machines and fabrics to a venue, everything was to hand and the presentation was very professional. It was live, so we interacted with our tutor well. However, after six hours I realised I had hardly moved all day!

I’m looking into how to organise teaching by Zoom, because I think it will be a requirement for some people for a long time to come. Nothing beats being all together and sharing knowledge and opinions, but it is a worthy addition to the teaching offer.

The Knitting and Stitching Show is going to go ahead live, in a limited way, 8 – 11th October at Alexandra Palace, London. Tickets are on sale now for morning or afternoon slots; no galleries, but plenty of retailers and workshops. Details from www.theknittingandstitchingshow.com

One of the retailers there, and a favourite trader of mine is Linladan. They sell contemporary and vintage ‘60s linen threads, kits, embroideries and other wonderful stuff. When the linen textile industry came to an end in Sweden the Linladan ladies found a whole load of haberdashery supplies which they have sorted through. It’s all so gorgeous! www.linladan.com

Meanwhile, don’t forget to check our website at: www.livingthreadstextileartists.com or email us at: livingthreadsgroup@gmail.com or check us out on Facebook.

We wish you all a speedy recovery if you or family have been unwell or had Covid-19, and that the rest of us manage to avoid it.

Everyone please stay safe and keep creating. We will get through this and come out the other side.

Until October!

Cheers

Gilli Theokritoff, Newsletter Editor